Lauren Spencer King, a Los Angeles-based artist, talks about Sigourney Weaver and swimming in the ocean.



Part 01.




Lauren Spencer King, Regards Gallery — 2016

Morning ...
Anew


Noon ...  
A balance of opposites


Night ...
Moonlight


Perfect happiness ...
Swimming in the ocean


Preposterous ...
I’m convinced that at any moment my dog will open her mouth and words will come out.


Fear ...
What you feel just before you discover the truth you seek.


Love ...
Something I learn more about every day.



Kaisersaal, the Residenz,  Weisburg, Germany — 1719



Extravagance ...
Rococo


Comedy ...
Coyote


Work ...
With your hands


Our time ...
Trying to right so many wrongs


The future ...
Returning


The past ...
Ancient


Part 02.







Most interesting thing in your wallet ...
A mercury dime from 1941, found in my mum’s jewelry box


In another life, you’d be ...
A dancer or Sigourney Weaver in Ghostbusters


Your lucky charm ...
Having faith… in myself, in others, in ideas, in the unknown, in the universe, in the future, in love


Words to live by ...
No words, it’s the feeling I get when I am being witness to something greater than myself, something magical and transformative


Prized possession ...
My heart


One wish ...
Truth


Your most marked characteristic ...
A friend told me today, “You have a purity of examination that does not shy away from the darkness of life.” I hope that’s true.


  
Cleopatra with the Asp, Guido Reni, 1628  — Martha Graham in Greenwich Follies, 1924 — Isabella Rossellini


A dream dinner party would be made up of who (dead or alive) ...
The women from my lineage along with Cleopatra, Martha Graham, Joan of Arc, Diana Vreeland, Isak Dinesen, Joan Didion, Lee Miller, Nina Simone, Isabella Rossellini, Gilda Radner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Susan Sontag. It’s a big dinner party, and it’s a pot-luck.


Favorite shoes ...
I prefer to be barefoot. 


Favorite store ...
Kremer Pigments in New York


Favorite friend ...
I haven’t met him yet.


    
Interiors, Lourdes Cabrera


Favorite place ...
The woods behind the home I grew up in, Jumbo Rock in Joshua Tree, the Blue Cave in Capri, Le Petit Trianon at Versailles


‘Music' by Jean-Honoré Fragonard — 1760


Favorite color ...
Those pale non-color colors, the pink in a Fragonard painting, the color people’s cheeks turn when they blush, and the colors of a landscape being lit by the light of the full moon


Favorite book ...
Too many. But one: my grandfather’s signed copy of Frank Lloyd Wright’s autobiography


Favorite website ...

The New Yorker, South Willard and Freunde von Freunden. I also lose hours on Wikipedia.



Lauren Spencer King


A favorite photo that you've taken ...
This is a photograph of the dining room in the house my grandfather designed and built for our family. After my mum died it took me four years to clear it out and get it ready to sell. I took this on the morning the movers came; My last morning in the house I grew up in. Now this place exists for me only in memories and photos. I know the photo isn’t of anything really. But, it holds so much of everything I was feeling then, and reminds me of how much I have learned about letting go, and what I am capable of.



Lee Miller in Hitler’s bathtub, Munich — 1945


A favorite photo that someone else has taken ...
This photo that has haunted me since I first saw it many years ago. It’s of Lee Miller in Hitler’s bathtub. She snuck into his Munich apartment after the fall in 1945. It amazes me the power that this photo holds. What an act of reclamation.


Part 03.




Barbara King and Thelma M. Hauser — 1974


You come from a long lineage of artists. Tell me about this ...

I feel very connected to the women on my mum’s side of the family. My mum was an amazing silversmith, her mother was a painter, her mother was a seamstress, and her mother was a healer with her hands. That’s as far back as I know. But I feel there is an energy that runs like a thread, weaving through all the women, that I feel in myself. Something of each of them has been passed down to me, a lot of it has to do with a powerful energy I feel in my hands.



“Fate,” Lauren Spencer King — 1974


Your work is grounded in the natural, the astrological and the sensory. Talk about this ...

I think a lot about the things I have faith in where I go to look for answers. I think art is one of those places, but I also look to things much greater than me, things that also act as mirrors. I am always trying to make connections between things that are extremely personal and things in the natural world that are immense and ancient. I think this is my way to try to understand and make sense of things. I am drawn to things that are mysterious and elusive.  




“Fear,” Lauren Spencer King — 2016


You work in many mediums. Talk about this ...

I’ve worked the longest in watercolor, the last 5 years with glass, and have recently fallen in love with drawing with graphite. I consider myself a painter. But really I’m invested in surfaces; the surface of paper that can be folded to become an object, or the folds of fabric that are rendered flat on the surface of paper. I think a lot about the relationship between things, and a subtle juxtaposition of opposites. I also think about how surfaces interact with light. The one material that seems to be in all of my work is paper, it even at times is glued onto glass.


Intuition is important to you. Why ...

I never really know how to talk about this question. Accept to say, yes, it is very important to me. It is my guide. A muscle I try to exercise and strengthen daily. I think the more you listen to it the stronger it gets. It is where so much wisdom lies. And I know it’s the one thing that is always right on.


What are you working on now ...

A small book that will be the second part of a show I had in November, In the Darkness. It will have some writing, some drawings and some sound recordings.

Tell me about a favorite painting ...

Oil Painting is a piece I made for my thesis show in 2011. It’s a small paper on panel piece, where a highly concentrated rose oil has been dripped onto the surface and is absorbed into the paper. The show was about the intensification of the senses during the first few months of grief. And I wanted to create a piece that could be with you while you were looking at other pieces in the show. Rose oil is also known to be linked to the heart, and upon smelling it has a heart opening effect. That’s the place in the body I kept thinking about effecting while creating the show, how intense sensory experiences can have an effect on the emotional body (and vise versa). The oil as a smell and as color fades over time, changing in each moment.



Home, Lauren Spencer King


Describe a day in the life of Lauren. How would it begin ? What would you do ? Where would you go ? What time would you be in bed ...

Every day is different, but what is pretty consistent is how I begin and end each day. I’m an early riser, I like rising with the sun. I take my dog, Ava, out. I usually try to stand in whatever little patch of sunlight I can find for a few moments to ground and be grateful before we come inside. I make breakfast, which is my favorite meal, and I usually make some juice or almond milk for the day.

Then, I’m either working all day, everyday, totally consumed by something in the studio, or I’m recovering from doing that. I’m also someone who thinks too much, so to balance that out I do something that puts me in my body, like going to yoga, dance, meditation, or on a hike. I try to do one of these things every day. Most nights I cook at home. Followed by my favorite way to end the day; early to bed with a book.  


Tell me about your creative process ... 

The best answer I can give is that every day I just try to show up. To listen, to be open to what ever wants to work through me, to catch whatever idea comes to me. Most ideas come to me during meditation, or while driving. I listen to a lot of books on tape while drawing or painting. Some days I go into the studio and spend time just sitting there with something I am making, I consider this working. I try to see as much art as I can in person, most of it bothers me. Which makes me want to go into the studio and make something I can live with. This doesn’t always happen and that I have to learn to live with.  I have a post-it note in the studio that says, “Make something you want to see in the world.” This is a good reminder for me. And sometimes it’s not easy, I think there is great risk in creating. At times it requires bravery.

Talk about future projects ...

Some new mirrored sculptures to be combined with graphite drawings.


Talk about a dream project ...

I don’t think I have one specific project in mind, but a dream of mine that I hope comes out of all the work I do (art, teaching, counseling, relationships) is change. It’s very altruistic, but I really want to change the world. I want to make an impact, change the way people think, to hold space for people in their own healing and understanding of themselves. Even if it’s just for one person.